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Fresh or Tired: Staedtler® Pigment Liner Sketch Pen 05mm

12/28/2010

Staedtler® Pigment Liner Sketch Pen has often intrigued me, but never enough to purchase the set usually sold for $12 at major office supply retailers. Then the nice people of Staedtler® were so kind to blister pack one of them and liberate $3.59 from my wallet. Oh those rascals. Actually, I was pretty excited. Though I wonder if Babby finds pen shopping with me confusing because I don’t tend to have extreme reactions as I deliberate over the rows and rows of unremarkable pens as though I were diamond expert nibbling on fine chocolate while rating stones in Antwerp. Then there it was; the lovely Pigment Liner. Out of the package its sleek barrel reminded me of a variety of the better crafting pens. With the performance on par with a Pitt Artist Pen I was digging the Stadtler model, but not enough to consider using adding to my stable of pens in heavy rotation. Nevertheless, I have noticed these pens in the cups and mesh holders of folks whose pen knowledge and tastes vastly outpaces my own so it got me to wondering. Is this a great pen, are there features that as a non-artist type I am unaware of. Do you like this pen? Tell me all about it. Does the pen make you want to smash things Incredible Hulk style? Are you all, “Staedtler Pigment, who?” Oh yes, DTPW? readers, it’s time again for you to scoff at or sing the praises of another product that may or may not be polarizing like whoa. One friend I posed this question to rolled her eyes, “I hope you like digging around your bag and finding it soaked with black ink that never washes away.” Yikes! Have you used this pen? Do you have the ink stained fingers and hands raw from repeated alcohol scrubbing courtesy of this pen? Do you love it having erected a shrine to it on a bookshelf? And so forth…

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8 Comments leave one →
  1. 12/28/2010 5:19 am

    I’m a big ol’ Staedtler fangirl, and the Pigment Liners are my favorite drawing pens. I’ve used them for years and they have never misbehaved (i.e. inky bags or fingers.) The fact the ink *never* washes away is what makes them great. I use them to write and draw in my visual journal. A big slop of watercolor over the inkline has no effect on it whatsoever.

    You are correct that the look and feel (in the hand) of the SPL is on par with PITTs, Sakura Pigma Microns, or Zig Millineums. The difference, and it’s a *huge* difference, is the nib and how it glides across the paper in comparison to the others. The others have nibs that seems to be squared off at the tip. The SPLs have a more rounded nib that holds up much better over time. The other brand’s nibs seem to smoosh out of shape resulting in unexpected stray lines. I have a fistful of all the others, but the SPLs are my go-to drawing pens.

    As a drawing pen it is well worth the price. I’m not sure this would be a good *value* as just a daily writer though. There are cheaper, better candidates on the market for that.

    And yes, I have a shrine for Staedtler writing implements. If it writes and has Staedtler on the side, it is coming home with me whether I need it or not.

  2. 12/28/2010 8:01 am

    I’m a great fan of many German products including Porsche, Mercedes, Faber-Castell and Staedtler, though working within the confines of this blog (and the current limitations of my finances) I can only discuss my experiences of the writing implement manufacturers. For colour, I think PITT pens are utterly wonderful. I first bought some about six maybe seven years ago, and I still have some of the original lesser used colours which are still usable. Recently I have also used the BIG brush versions which are just as good . . . . . except bigger

    When it comes to black though I have experimented with the other German counterpart, and Pigma. The Staedtler was quite good, though I found that the points tend to deform more, and they do not not have the covering power of the Pigma. I live in rural Italy (he said smugly…) and consequently it is quite difficult to ‘nip to the local art shop’ where they only ever have numerous watercolour sets anyway! So the Pigma’s I have to order from the UK. I recently found a store in Florence that had a limited number in stock as well as Copic which I tried and quite liked: though I opted for the very finest which means that small sketch becomes a labour of Herculean proportions if you want to build up any density . . . like shoveling snow with a teaspoon. So for now I will stay an apostle of the multi-coloured church of St. Faber de Castell…. with monchromatic allegiance to the shrine of Sakura Micron.

  3. 12/28/2010 8:05 am

    P.S. I’ve just realised that my site address is incorrect in the previous comment.

    It should be http://www.reallyaccessiblememory.com

    Geat writing implements do not assure good writing…..

  4. Bridgett permalink
    12/28/2010 1:54 pm

    I like them because you can leave the cap off for quite a while and still come back to a working pen. My officemates are college aged and inveterate pen borrowers so anything I leave in a pen cup needs to be durable and distinctive. Distinctive so that I can recover it later. Durable because destroying things comes to them easy as thought. The Staedtlers fit the bill on both counts.

  5. 12/29/2010 11:53 am

    As a drawing pen it is well worth the price. I’m not sure this would be a good *value* as just a daily writer though. There are cheaper, better candidates on the market for that.

    And yes, I have a shrine for Staedtler writing implements. If it writes and has Staedtler on the side, it is coming home with me whether I need it or not.

    @Speck – this was lovely to read. I am a huge fan of Staedtler and so frankly I was rather shocked by the negative chatter amongst my artsy-fartsy friends wrt to this product. I feel vindicated by your response as well as the response of others! Thank you so much!

  6. 12/29/2010 11:55 am

    When it comes to black though I have experimented with the other German counterpart, and Pigma. The Staedtler was quite good, though I found that the points tend to deform more, and they do not not have the covering power of the Pigma. I live in rural Italy (he said smugly…) and consequently it is quite difficult to ‘nip to the local art shop’ where they only ever have numerous watercolour sets anyway! So the Pigma’s I have to order from the UK. I recently found a store in Florence that had a limited number in stock as well as Copic which I tried and quite liked: though I opted for the very finest which means that small sketch becomes a labour of Herculean proportions if you want to build up any density . . . like shoveling snow with a teaspoon. So for now I will stay an apostle of the multi-coloured church of St. Faber de Castell…. with monchromatic allegiance to the shrine of Sakura Micron.

    @Roland – HAHAHA. That was incredible. I haven’t had quite as much experience with Pigma, but the limited experience I’ve had has been positive. I also am a huge fan of St. Faber de Castell, which is what I will now call them from this point forward! Thank you for stopping by and making me laugh real belly laughs!

  7. 12/29/2010 11:57 am

    I like them because you can leave the cap off for quite a while and still come back to a working pen. My officemates are college aged and inveterate pen borrowers so anything I leave in a pen cup needs to be durable and distinctive. Distinctive so that I can recover it later. Durable because destroying things comes to them easy as thought. The Staedtlers fit the bill on both counts.

    @Bridgett – that feature I have noticed, because when it comes to keeping their caps, my pens tend to be like toddlers with socks! And having my college career not that far away from me I can attest to the awesome destruction power of college aged folk! Thanks for that feedback. Yay, another positive for the pigment liner!

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